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Molly Scott Cato, Professor of Strategy and Sustanability launches her book, The Bioregional Economy on Wedesday 12 December 2012.

Leading green economist and Professor of Strategy and Sustainability at the University of Roehampton, Molly Scott Cato lays out her strategy for the provisioning of the world’s resources. She offers a model for achieving the 90% reductions in carbon emissions that are needed to avoid dangerous climate change and proposes a system of self-reliant local economies organised around ‘bioregions’.

In her book – The Bioregional Economy - launched today (Wednesday 12 December), Professor Scott Cato sets out a visionary account of what a bioregional approach to the economy would mean — and how to get there. The book will be launched in the Convent Parlour, Digby Stuart College, University of Roehampton, London SW15 at 5pm.

The synopsis for her book follows:

Green economists suggest a need to replace the globalised economy, and its extended supply chains, with a more ‘local’ economy. But what does this mean in more concrete terms? How large is a local economy, how self-reliant can it be, and what resources will still need to be imported? The concept of the ‘bioregion’ may facilitate the reconceptualisation of the global economy as a system of largely self-sufficient local economies.

A bioregional approach to economics assumes a different system of values to that which dominates neoclassical economics. The global economy is driven by growth, and the consumption ethic that matches this is one of expansion in range and quantity. Goods are defined as scarce, and access to them is a process based on competition. The bioregional approach challenges every aspect of that value system. It seeks a new ethic of consumption that prioritises locality, accountability and conviviality in the place of expansion and profit; it proposes a shift in the focus of the economy away from profits and towards provisioning; and it assumes a radical reorientation of work from employment towards livelihood.

The Bioregional Economy is published by Routledge.

Story posted: Wednesday, 12 December 2012

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