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Dr Aisha K. Gill

Dr Aisha K. Gill

Reader in Criminology

Department of Social Sciences

About

Dr Aisha K. Gill (B.A., M.A. [Di], Ph.D (University of Essex)) PGCHE, is a Reader in Criminology at University of Roehampton. Her main areas of interest and research are health and criminal justice responses to violence against black, minority ethnic and refugee (BMER) women in the UK, Iraqi Kurdistan and India. She has been involved in addressing the problem of violence against women (VAW) at the grassroots level for the past fifteen years. She is a board member of 'End Violence Against Women' Coalition (EVAW); invited adviser to the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) strategic support group on investigations and complaints involving gendered forms of violence against women in the UK (including domestic violence); member of Liberty's Project Advisory Group; member of Kurdish Women's Rights Watch; Imkaan and Chair of Newham Asian Women's Project (2004-2009).

Dr Gill has extensive experience of providing expert advice to the Government, Ministry of Justice, Scotland Yard, Crown Prosecution Service, and the voluntary sector on legal policy issues related to so-called 'honour' killings and forced marriage. She has challenged politicians to be more inclusive of BMER women's voices in policy-making on issues of gender-based violence and human rights. Her current research interests include domestic violence; rights, law and forced marriage; so-called 'honour' killings and 'honour’-based violence in the South Asian/Kurdish Diaspora and femicide in Iraqi Kurdistan and India; missing women; acid violence; child contact; trafficking; and sexual violence and exploitation. She has also published widely in peer-reviewed journals (see publications section) and is currently co-authoring a monograph entitled 'Crimes of 'Honour' against Women: Experiences and Counter Strategies in Iraqi Kurdistan and the UK Kurdish Diaspora' that will be published by Ashgate in Autumn 2014. Current research projects are funded by the British Academy (see details below). Dr Gill is often in the news as a commentator on forced marriage, violence against women and so-called ‘honour’ killings. She writes for mainstream popular as well as academic audiences.

Subjects Taught

Current

  • Gender Violence and Human Rights (Convener, 2004 - )
  • Criminal Justice and Domestic Violence (Convener, 2005 - )
  • Youth, Crime and Justice (Convener, 2004 - )
  • Crime Control and Criminal Justice (Convener, 2004 - )

Past Teaching

  • Criminology, Human Rights and Social Justice (Joint Convener, 2008 - 2011)
  • Reading and Writing Criminology (Convener, 2003 - 2007)
  • Reading Criminological Text (2003-4)
  • Introduction to Criminology (2003-4)

Areas of specific interest

I am particularly interested in supervising postgraduate research in the following areas:

  • violence against women/crimes of patriarchy/femicide/forced marriage/so-called ‘honour’ killings/ ‘honour’-based violence
  • gender, crime and victimisation
  • gender, human rights and/or feminist theory
  • women’s movements and policy
  • punishment and crime (‘race’, gender and social class)
  • domestic violence, criminal justice policy and law
  • sexual violence and child sexual exploitation

Graduate Student Supervision

  1. Naheed Anwar (2012 - ) A study of Salafi Women in Birmingham, (director)
  2. Ahalya Bala  (2012 - ) Political Activism and Radicalisation Amongst Younger Generation Tamils in London (co-supervised with Professor John Eade)
  3. Trishima Mitra-Kahn (2010) PhD Sociology and Anthropology, Performing Feminism: Activism against Street Sexual Harassment in Urban North India, (co-supervised with Dr Marzia Balzani)
  4. Yasmina Benhamou (2010) MA International Relations and Human Rights, A Critical Examination of Morocco’s Legal Policies and International Commitments in Addressing Domestic Violence, (director)
  5. Funmi Johnson (2007) MA Equality and Diversity, The Struggle for Equality: The State and the Violence Against Women Movement in the UK, (director)
Research Funding

Current

1. British Academy Small Research grant to investigate sex offenders and sexual violence in South Asian communities (JI 2013-2015)

Completed

1. British Academy Overseas Travel Grant for 'Honour' Killings Conference in Canberra, Australia [2011]
2. British Academy Small Research grant to investigate so-called 'honour' killings in Punjab, India [PI, 2011-2012]

3. NSPCC Funded project ‘Child Contact in the Context of Post-Separation Violence: Issues for Black and Minority Ethnic Women and Children’ [CI, 2008-2011]
4. Forced Marriage Unit (Foreign Commonwealth Office) grant for 'Change Together: A pilot project to create informed choice for students facing Forced Marriage' in collaboration with Asha Project - Lambeth [Consultant, 2010]
5. Kurdistan Regional Government grant for the project 'An Investigation into 'Honour'-based Violence (HBV) and 'Honour'-based Killings in Iraqi Kurdistan and the Kurdish Diaspora in the UK: Contested debates on gendered violence, ‘honour’, ethnicity, nation and the quest to eradicate HBV' [JI, 2008-2010]

HBV Report in English
HBV Report in Kurdish

HBV Summary/Action Plan in English

6. 'Together we can end violence against women and girls' consultation support (Home Office, Violent Crime Unit) [Stakeholder Consultant, 2009]
7. 'An Investigation into 'Honour'- based Violence (HBV) in the Sikh community in the UK (Metropolitan Sikh Police Association) [PI, 2009]
8. Economic and Social Research Council and Technology Strategy Board [JI, 2008-2009]
9. Roehampton University funded project by CRUCIBLE, Institute for Child Well-Being and Newham Asian Women's Project, ‘COPE: Empowering young people to cope with life's challenges’ [JI, 2008]
10. Home Office/Foreign Commonwealth Office Funded project ‘Forced Marriage: Data Analysis of the Government's Forced Marriage Criminalisation Consultation Response’ [PI, 2007]
11. European Commission Funded Project with the Berlin Institute for Comparative Social Research (BIVS), Berlin on 'Female Marriage Migration' [PI, 2006]
12. West Sussex Crime Reduction Partnership Board Research Grant for the project ‘Needs assessment of domestic violence services in West Sussex’ A. Gill [JI, 2004]

Professional links
  • Member of the Feminist Review Collective
  • Membership of the British Society of Criminology
  • Membership of the British Sociological Association
  • Membership of the Institute of Learning and Teaching in Higher Education since 2002
Violence against Women Campaigns

Each year, 3 million women across the UK experience rape, domestic violence, forced marriage, trafficking or another form of gender-based violence and there are many, many more who have suffered violence in the past. They deserve specialised support services, such as refuges and Rape Crisis Centres, yet Map of Gaps, published by the End Violence Against Women Campaign and the Equality and Human Rights Commission, graphically shows the postcode lottery in these essential services:

  • Only one in ten local authorities have services for ethnic minority women
  • A third of local authorities across the UK have no specialised services at all
  • Most women in the UK don't have access to a Rape Crisis Centre

See the latest report: The map of gaps.

Grants, Awards and Fellowships

Dr Gill has received several awards and honours for her academic achievements:

  • Recipient of the Alumnus of the Year Award, University of Essex, July 2012
  • Winner of the Asian Women of Achievement Awards, Category: Professional of the Year, May 2011
  • Hind Rattan Award (Jewel of India) in the field of education, January 2011
  • United Nations, Division for the Advancement of Women Award to attend Expert Group Summit on 'Developing Good Practices in Legislation to Address Harmful Practices', Addis Abba, Ethiopia, May 2009
  • Economic and Social Research Council Scholarship, University of Essex, UK, 1998-2001
  • Economic and Social Research Council Scholarship, University of Essex, UK, 1997-1998
  • Police Research Award Scheme Innovation Award. Home Office, London, UK, June 1997
  • Department of Sociology Fuller Bequest Project Prize, University of Essex, UK, July 1996
Media Work

Available for media contact about:
Violence against women, in particular so-called 'honour' killings, forced marriage, acid violence, domestic violence and policing, sexual violence, race and gender issues.

Qualifications

B.A., M.A. [Distinction], Ph.D (Essex), PGCHE

Articles

Books

Other

Articles

Articles in Peer-Reviewed/Refereed Journals:

[A29] Aujla, W., Gill, A. (2014) Conceptualizing Honour Killings in Canada: An extreme form of domestic violence? International Journal of Criminal Justice Science (forthcoming).

[A28] Gill, A., Harrison, K. (2014) The social construction of dangerous Asian sex offenders, International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, (forthcoming).

[A27] Gill, A., Van-Engeland, A. (2014) Criminalisation or ‘multiculturalism without culture’? Comparing British and French approaches to tackling forced marriage, Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law (forthcoming)

[A26] Cowburn, M, Gill, A., Harrison, K. (2014) Speaking about sexual abuse in South Asian communities: Offenders, victims and the challenges of shame, Journal of Sexual Aggression (forthcoming).

[A25] Gill, A., Brah, A. (2014) Interrogating cultural narratives about ‘honour’-based violence, European Journal of Women's Studies, Vol 21, No.1. 79-93.

[A24] Anitha, S., Gill, A. (2014) A Moral Panic? The problematisation of forced marriage in British newspaper reporting, Violence Against Women Journal (forthcoming).

[A23] Gill, A. and Harrison, K. (2013) Sentencing sex offenders in India: Retributive justice versus a different way forward, International Journal of Criminal Justice Sciences, .8 (2): 161- 181 http://www.sascv.org/ijcjs/pdfs/gillharrisonijcjs2013vol8issue2.pdf

[A22] Gill, A. (2013) Feminist reflections on researching so-called 'honour' killings, Feminist Legal Studies, Vol. 21, 3: 241-261.

[A21] Gill, A., Mason-Bish, H. (2013) Addressing violence against women as a form of hate crime: Limitations and possibilities, Feminist Review, 105, (1): 1-20.

[A20] Rew, M., Gangoli, G., Gill, A. (2013) Violence between female in-laws in India, International Journal of Women's Studies, Vol 14, No. 1.

[A19] Gill, A., Begikhani, N., Hague, G. (2012) ‘Honour’ - based Violence in Kurdish communities, Women's Studies International Forum, 35: 75-85. (subscription required).

[A18] Kelly, L., Gill, A. (2012) Rotis not Riots: A feminist dialogue on the riots and their aftermath, Safer Communities Journal, Vol.11, No.1. 61-72. (subscription required).

[A17] Begikhani, N., Gill. A, Hague, G. (2012) ‘Honour’-based violence and Kurdish communities: Moving towards action and change in Iraqi Kurdistan and the UK, Journal of Gender and Society.

[A16] Gill, A., Mitra-Kahn, T. (2012) Modernising the 'other': Assessing the ideological underpinnings of the policy discourse on forced marriage in the UK, Journal of Policy and Politics, 39, 1. (subscription required).

[A15] Gill, A. (2009) “Honour” Killings and the quest for justice in black and minority ethnic communities in the UK, Criminal Justice Policy Review, 20, (4): 475-494. (subscription required).

[A14] Gill, A., Anitha, S. (2009) The illusion of protection? An analysis of forced marriage legislation and policy in the UK, Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law, 31 (3): 257–269. (subscription required).

[A13] Anitha, S., Gill, A. (2009) Coercion, consent and the forced marriage debate in the UK, Feminist Legal Studies, 17 (2): 165-184. (subscription required).

[A12] Gill, A., Mitra-Kahn, T. (2009) Explaining daughter devaluation and the issue of missing women in South Asia and the UK, Current Sociology, 57 (5): 684–703.(subscription required).

[A11] DeVito, D., Gill, A., Short, D. (2009) Rape characterised as genocide, Sur: International Journal of Human Rights, 6 (10): 29- 51.

[A10] Gill, A. (2008) Crimes of ‘honour’ and violence against women in the UK, International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice, Vol. 32 (2). (subscription required).

[A9] Gill, A., Banga, B. (2008) "A specialist refuge space of my own”: BMER women, housing and domestic violence, Journal of Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, Vol 1, Issue 2, December.

[A8] Gill, A., Banga, B. (2008) Black, minority ethnic and refugee women, domestic violence and access to housing, A Race Equality Foundation Briefing Paper, No 9: London, October Issue.

[A7] Gill, A., Radford, L. (2007) Domestic violence policies under New Labour: Wasted years? Centre for Crime and Justice Studies Journal, Autumn edition.

[A6] McAlpine, C., Gill, A. & Hegarty, P. (2007) Why Criminalise forced marriage? –Islamophobia and assimilation based justifications, The Psychology of Women Section Review, 9 (2): 15-28.

[A5] Gill, A. (2006) Patriarchal violence in the name of ‘honour’, International Journal of Criminal Justice Sciences, V1 (1): 1-12.

[A4] Radford, L., Gill, A. (2006) Losing the plot? Researching community safety partnership work against domestic violence, Howard Journal of Criminal, 45 (4): 369-387.

[A3] Gill, A. (2005) Governing violence: Gender, community, and state interventions, Journal of Community Safety, 4 (2): 37-45.

[A2] Gill, A. (2004) ‘Voicing the silent fear: South Asian women’s experiences of domestic violence’, Howard Journal of Criminal Justice, 43 (5): 465-483.

[A1] Gill, A., Rehman, G. (2004) Empowerment through activism: responding to domestic violence in the South Asian community, Gender and Development, 12 (1): 75-82.

Non–Refereed Articles:

[NRA25] Dustin, H., Gill, A. (2013) Weathering the storm: Campaigning on Westminster policy on violence against women and girls in times of political and economic uncertainty, Safe Journal of Domestic Abuse, (Issue, Summer).

[NRA23] Gill, A. (2012) Forced marriage stand-alone law: Will it work? Safe Journal of Domestic Abuse, (Issue 42, Summer)

[NRA22] Gill, A. (2012) Making the case for Legal Aid funding for victims/survivors of domestic violence, Family Law Journal (forthcoming)

[NRA21] Pearce, N., Gill, A. (2012) Criminalisation of forced marriage as stand-alone legislation: Will it work? Family Law Journal, May Issue.

[NRA20] Gill, A., Howes, S. (2012) The value of Legal Aid: Listening to women and the cost of cutting back, Safe Journal of Domestic Abuse, (Issue 40, Winter).

[NRA19] Gill, A. (2011) Criminalising forced marriage: Findings from an independent study, Family Law Journal, December Issue.

[NRA18] Gill, A. (2011) Human Rights and Civil Legal Aid: The case for providing funding for civil cases involving victims of domestic violence, London: National Federation of Women’s Institutes.

[NRA17] Gill, A. (2011) Violence against women in the name of ‘honour’ in Kurdish communities. Al-Nisa Magazine, (Issue 16).

[NRA16] Gill, A. (2010) So-called 'honour' killings and criminal justice interventions in the UK, Magistrates Association Journal, 66 (3).

[NRA15] Gill, A., Anitha, S. (2010) Forced marriage legislation and policy in the UK: Taking stock, Safe Journal of Domestic Abuse, (Issue 33, Spring).

[NRA14] Gill, A. (2009) Addressing the 'cultural silence' of rape in UK South Asian communities, Safe Journal of Domestic Abuse, (Issue 32, Autumn).

[NRA13] Gill, A. (2009) "A BMER specialist refuge roof over my head": BMER women, domestic violence and access to housing, Safe Journal of Domestic Abuse, (Winter Issue).

[NRA12] Gill, A. (2008) IPCC Investigation determines that the MPS “could have done more” to prevent the murder of Banaz Mahmod, Safe Journal of Domestic Abuse, (Summer Issue).

[NRA11] Gill, A. (2008) "Dis [honour]" killings, Police Review, April 2008.

[NRA10] Gill, A. , Banga, B. (2008) The reality and impact of the Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act 2004 on BMER women experiencing gender-based violence, Safe Journal of Domestic Abuse UK, (Spring Issue).

[NRA9] Gill, A. , Sharma, K. (2005) No access to justice: Gender, immigration law and domestic violence, Safe Journal, UK.

[NRA8] Gill, A. (2004) 'Honour'-based violence, London: Change Kvinnoforum.

[NRA6] Gill, A. (2004) ‘Against my will’: Violence, suicide and honour in the Asian Community, Community Care Journal, October 2004.

[NRA6] Radford, L., Gill, A., Burrows, S., Bone, J. (2004) Moving forward on prevention: Domestic violence and community safety in West Sussex, University of Surrey Roehampton.

[NRA5] Gill, A. (2004) The socio-cultural context of violence against South Asian women in the UK, Police Review, June 2004.

[NRA4] Gill, A. (2003) Maintaining izzat/honour: Domestic violence in the South Asian community, Community Care, pp 42-44. April 2003.

[NRA3] Gill, A. (2003) Faces of honour, The Domestic Abuse Quarterly, Women’s Aid, Bristol: Women’s Aid Federation of England.

[NRA2] Gill, A. (2003) Loss of face: Silence, violence and shame in South Asian societies, Refugee Journal, May, pp 9-12, London.

[NRA1] Gill, A. (2003) The ideology of izzat and sharam in the South Asian Community, Police Review, Sept, pp 17-19.

Selected Reviews

[BR2] Gill, A. (2007) Dreams, Questions & Struggles: South Asian Women in Britain. By Amrit Wilson (Pluto Press, 2006) in British Journal of Sociology, Vol. 58 (2).

[BR1] Gill, A. (2004) From Homebreakers to Jailbreakers: Southall Black Sisters. By Rahila Gupta (London, Zed Press, 2003) in British Journal of Criminology, November 2004, Vol. 44 (6).

 

Books

Published

Aisha Gill book covers

[B1] Thiara, R., Gill, A. (2010) Violence Against South Asian Women: Issues for Policy and Practice, London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers (ISBN: 9781843106708).
http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/book.php/isbn/9781843106708

[B2] Gill, A., Anitha, S. (2011) Forced Marriage: Introducing a social justice and human rights perspective, London: Zed Books (ISBN: 9781848134638).

[B3] Gill, A. (2014) (with Strange, C., Roberts, K.) ‘Honour’ Killing and Violence: Theory, Policy and Practice, London: Palgrave Macmillan http://us.macmillan.com/honourkillingandviolence/AishaKGill

[B4] Gill, A. (2015) (with Begikhani, N., Hague, G.) 'Honour'-based violence: Experiences and Counter Strategies in Iraqi Kurdistan and the UK Kurdish Diaspora, Aldershot: Ashgate (forthcoming).

Peer-Reviewed Chapters in Edited Books

[BC16] Gill, A. (2014) ‘Honour’, ‘honour’-based violence and so-called ‘honour’ killings, in Gill, A., Roberts, K., Strange, C. (eds) ‘Honour’ Killing and Violence: Theory, Policy and Practice, London: Palgrave Macmillan.

[BC15] Gill, A. (2014) “All they think about is honour”: The Murder of Shafilea Ahmed, in Gill, A., Roberts, K., Strange, C. (eds) ‘Honour’ Killing and Violence: Theory, Policy and Practice, London: Palgrave Macmillan.

[BC14] Kelly, L., Gill, A. (2012) Reading the riots through gender: a feminist reflection on England's 2011 riots, in Briggs, D. (ed) The English riots of 2011: A summer of discontent, Hampshire: Waterside Press.

[BC13] Gill, A. (2012) Intersecting Inequalities: Implications for addressing forced marriage and ‘honour’ based violence for those working in social work and related professions, in McMillan, L. and Lombard, N (eds) Current Theory and Practice in Domestic Abuse, Sexual Violence and Exploitation, London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

[BC12] Gill, A., Anitha, S. (2011) Framing forced marriage as a form of violence against women, in Gill, A., Anitha, S. (eds.) Forced Marriage: Introducing a social justice and human rights perspective, London: Zed Books.

[BC11] Anitha, S., Gill, A. (2011) A critical analyses of consent and coercion in forced marriage, in Gill, A., Anitha, S. (eds.) Forced Marriage: Introducing a social justice and human rights perspective, London: Zed Books.

[BC10] Gill, A., Anitha, S. (2011) Forced marriage legislation in the UK: A critique, in Gill, A., Anitha, S. (eds.) Forced Marriage: Introducing a social justice and human rights perspective, London: Zed Books.

[BC9] Anitha, S., Gill, A. (2011) The social construction of forced marriage and its ‘victim’ in media coverage and crime policy discourses, in Gill, A., Anitha, S. (eds.) Forced Marriage: Introducing a social justice and human rights perspective, London: Zed Books.

[BC8] Squire, G., Gill, A. (2011) “It’s not all heartbeat you know”: Policing domestic violence in rural areas, in Mawby, R and Yarwood, R. (eds.) Policing, Rurality and Governance, Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing.

[BC7] Gill, A. (2010) Violence against women in South Asian communities in the UK: A culture of silence, in McGlynn, C. and Munro, V. (eds) Rethinking Rape Law: International and Comparative Perspectives. London: Routledge-Cavendish Publishing.

[BC6] Gill, A. (2010) Reconfiguring 'honour' - based violence as a form of gendered violence, in Idriss, M., and Abbas, T. (eds.) Honour, Violence, Women and Islam, London and New York: Routledge-Cavendish.

[BC5] Gill, A., Mitra-Kahn, T. (2010) ‘Moving toward a “multiculturalism without culture”: constructing a victim - friendly human rights approach to forced marriage in the UK’, in Thiara, R., Gill, A. (eds.) Violence Against South Asian Women: Issues for Policy and Practice', London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

[BC4] Thiara, R., Gill, A. (2010) Understanding violence against South Asian women: What it means for practice, in Thiara, R., Gill, A. (eds.) Violence Against South Asian Women: Issues for Policy and Practice, London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

[BC3] Sharma, K., Gill, A. (2010) ‘Protection for all? The failures of the domestic violence rule for (im)migrant Women’, in Thiara, R., Gill, A. (eds) Violence Against South Asian Women: Issues for Policy and Practice, London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

[BC2] Gill, A. (2009) South Asian women’s experiences of rape: Analysis of the narrative of survival, in Horvath, M. and Brown, J. (eds.) Rape: Challenging Contemporary Thinking. Devon: Willan Publishing.

[BC1] Gill, A., Sharma, K. (2006) 'Response and responsibility: Domestic violence and marriage migration in the UK', in Walsum, S., Spijkerboer, T. (eds.) Women and Immigration Law: New Variations on Classical Feminist Themes, London: Glasshouse Press.

Other

Conference and Seminar Papers

[78] Keynote address for International Women's Day, 'Women in Conflict', Kings College, University of Cambridge, 7 March 2014.

[77] “All they think about is honour”: The Murder of Shafilea Ahmed. Presented to Bloomsbury Gender Network, SOAS Centre for Gender Studies, 12 December 2013.

[76] Improving the handling of rape cases in South Asian communities. Paper presented to the Centre for Parliamentary Studies, Public Policy Exchange, London, 28 November 2013.

[75] Sentencing sex offenders in India. Paper presented to Feminism in London conference, Institute of Education, University of London, 26 October 2013.

[74] Seeking justice for victims of domestic violence. Paper presented to All Party Parliamentary Group on Victims and Witnesses. Committee Rm. 9, House of Commons, 9 October 2013.

[73] Interrogating cultural narratives about ‘honour’- based violence. Guest lecture presented at the Institute of Criminology, Sidney Sussex College, University of Cambridge, 4 September 2013.

[72] A Question of Inequality, Not Just Culture: The British media’s framing of ‘honour’-based violence’. Tackling Violence Against Women and Girls: The Next Steps. Paper presented to the Centre for Parliamentary Studies, Public Policy Exchange, London, 13 March 2013.
[71] Feminist reflections on researching so-called 'honour' killings. Paper presented to Global Women's Studies series, NUI Galway, Ireland, 22 November 2012.
[70] When excellence isn’t enough – managing the teaching /learning relationship in an era of direct payments to higher education: a case study. Paper presented to SEDA Higher Education conference, Aston University, Birmingham, 15-16 November 2012.
[C69] Reading the August 2011 England riots through Gender. Paper presented to Critical Perspectives on Urban Disorder, Aston University, Birmingham, 31 October 2012.
[C68] Addressing so-called 'Honour' killings and Forced Marriage, Paper presented to Jordan’s Family Law conference, London, 20 September 2012.
[C67] A critical analysis of the Coalition Government’s proposals to criminalise forced marriage as a stand-alone law. Paper presented to the Centre for Parliamentary Studies, Public Policy Exchange, London, 30 May 2012.
[C66] So-called 'honour' killings and criminal justice interventions in the UK. Paper presented to the National British Pakistani Conference, University of Oxford, Magdalen College, Oxford, 28-29 April 2012.
[C65] Critique of the ideological underpinnings of the legal and policy discourse on forced marriage in the UK. Paper presented to the 'Socio-Legal Studies Association' Conference, Leicester Law School, Leicester, 3-5 April 2012.

[C64] Investigating so-called 'honour' killings and forced marriage in the UK Kurdish Community. Paper presented to the ‘Honour Killing across Culture and Time’ Conference, Australian National University, Canberra, 8-9 December 2011.

[C63] Addressing Forced Marriage in the UK: Implications for the Australian context. Paper presented to University of Melbourne, In Touch Multicultural Centre against Family Violence, the SAFER Project, Domestic Violence Victoria and the Office for Women’s Policy, Melbourne Australia, 7 December 2011.

[C62] The nuts and bolts of conducting sensitive research in dangerous conflict zones. Paper presented to School of Policy Studies, University of Bristol, 28 October 2011.
[C61] ‘Harmful’ Practices: Interventions to Address Gendered Forms of Violence against Women and Girls in the UK. Paper presented to the XXXII International Congress on Law and Mental Health, Humboldt University, Berlin, July 17 - 22, 2011.
[C60] Intersecting Inequalities: Implications for addressing violence against BMER women in the UK Paper present to A Conducive Context? Misogyny, inequality, violence, London South Bank University, 22 June 2011.
[C59] Challenging so-called ‘honour’ killings in the Kurdish Diaspora and Iraqi Kurdistan. Paper presented to HBV Launch Event funded by the Kurdish Regional Government, Salahuddin University and University of Sulaimaniya, Northern Iraq, 25th - 29th November 2010.
[C58] The politics of addressing violence against women in BMER communities. Feminism in London 2010: Violence against women as hate crime? October 2010.
[C57] Contesting harmful social practices: Interventions to address gendered forms of violence against women and girls. 10th World Conference on Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion. Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, London, September 2010.
[C56] Good practices in legislation on forced marriage: UK response and critique of civil remedies to address violence against women. Measuring up? UK compliance with international commitments on violence against women in England’, Rights of Women, London, 22 June 2010.
[C55] Feasibility study to assess the possibilities, opportunities and needs to standardise national legislation on gender violence and violence against children. Invited to International Expert Group Meeting, Brussels, 14-15 June, 2010. Organised by Human European Consultancy in partnership with Tilburg University (INTERVICT, International Victimology Institute Tilburg), London Metropolitan University (CWASU, Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit) and University of Osnabruck.
[C54] Violence against South Asian women in the UK: Making the case for an integrated response to rape and sexual violence. Paper presented to LOKK conference on “Sexual Violence and Ethnic Minorities" Copenhagen, Denmark, 3 June 2009.
[C53] "Good practices in legislation on so-called 'honour' killings and forced marriage: UK response and critique." Paper presented at Expert Group Meeting on good practices in legislation to address harmful practices against women, United Nations Division for the Advancement of Women in collaboration with United Nations Economic Commission for Africa. United Nations Office. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 25 - 28 May 2009.
[C52] Child contact and post-separation violence: Issues for South Asian families. Presented to IAS Research Workshop Series 3 / Violence Against Women Research Group: Domestic Violence and South Asian Families, University of Bristol, 21 May 2009.
[C51] Gender, the state and patriarchy: ‘Honour’ crimes in the UK. Presented to Law and Social Sciences Research Network Inaugural Conference (Lassnet). Organised by the Centre for the Study of Law and Governance, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India, January 8-11, 2009.
[C50] Crimes of 'Honour' and Forced Marriage: Is there a link? Presented to West Midlands Family Justice Council, Birmingham, 28th November 2008.
[C49] Addressing the Hidden Landscape of Violence Against Women in BMER Communities. Presented to the Centre for Parliamentary Studies, Public Policy Exchange, London, 13th November 2008.
[C48] Safeguarding Survivors and Specialist Violence Against Women Services in BMER Communities in the UK: Anybody Really Listening? Presented to Women’s Aid National Conference, University of Leicester, 17th - 18th July 2008.
[C47] Proving you're a good (enough) victim: The reality of domestic violence in the lives of women with no recourse to public funds in the UK. Presented to "In Search of Solutions: Immigration Law, Domestic Violence & NRPF Seminar. Organised by Imkaan, 1 Pump Court, Southall Black Sisters & North Kensington Law Centre, London, 22nd May 2008.
[C46] Creating Safe Spaces: Specialist Services and the Needs of Black and Minority Ethnic & Refugee (BMER) Women. Presented to "Capita Conference Briefing on 'Honour-Based' Violence & Forced Marriages", London, 20th May, 2008.
[C45] Killing Women for so- called ‘Honour’ and the Quest for Justice in Black and Minority Ethnic Communities. Presented to "Family Aggression: Causes & Consequences” First Biennial Conference of the International Family Aggression Society. University of Central Lancashire, 18th - 19th March, 2008.
[C44] Forced Marriage, Protection and the Law. Presented to BAMER: The Law and Violence - Where's the Justice? Organised by Rights of Women, London, 26th September 2007.
[C43] Violence and 'Honour': The Politics of Killing Women. Presented to Domestic Abuse Conference: Protection, Prevention, Performance - An Integrated Approach. Organised by National Offender Management Service (NOMS), York, 25th September, 2007.
[C42] Domestic violence policies under New Labour: Wasted years? Presented to the Criminal Justice and Social Justice Conference, King’s College London, 5th-6th July 2007.
[C41] 'Activism Inside and Outside the Academy'. Presented to Postgraduate and Early Career Academics Network of Scholars, organised by Research Centre for Law, Gender and Sexuality, Kent University, 27th April, 2007.
[C40] Patriarchy, Femicidal Violence and 'Honour'. Presented to Tower Hamlets Domestic Violence Forum Conference Migrant & Ethnic Minority Women and Domestic Violence, 10 years on... 19th April, 2007.
[C39] Everybody's Business: Violence against Women and the Quest for Justice for Black and Minority Ethnic Communities. Presented to the Annual Undergraduate Lecture Series, Essex University, 7th December, 2006.
[C38] Forced Marriages: Exploring the Viability of Creating a Civil Protection Bill in the UK. Presented to Rogalands Project Against Forced Marriage Conference, Stvanger, Norway, 6th December, 2006.
[C37] Identity Formation and Young Muslim Women: A UK Perspective. Presented to 'Dobbeltliv' Conference organised by Lokk, Copenhagen, Denmark, 23rd November 2006.
[C36] 'Forced Marriages': Negotiating Agency, Responsibility, and Justice with the State. Presented to Gender Equality, Cultural Diversity: European Comparisons and Lessons, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, 8-9 June 2006, Metropolitan, Buitenveldertselaan 3, Amsterdam.
[C35] 'I Don't Want to Report my Mum and Dad to the Police': Forced Marriages and the Law. Presented to 'Forced Marriage a Wrong not a Right' Seminar, Newham Asian Women's Project/Roehampton University, East London Child Care Institute, 15th November, 2005.
[C34] 'Gender, Immigration Law and Citizenship'. Presented to Women Asylum Seekers from Pakistan Seminar. Hosted by Manchester Law Centre, Manchester, 8th November, 2005.
[C33] 'Domestic Violence & the Law in the UK'. Presented to the International Association of Women Police, 43rd Annual Training Conference, Leeds, 10-15 September, 2005.
[C32] 'Losing the Plot? Researching Community Safety Partnership Work against Domestic Violence'. Presented to the 14th World Congress of Criminology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA, 7-11 August, 2005.
[C31] 'Patriarchal Violence & the Prevalence of Dishonourable Crimes against Women: A UK Perspective'. Presented to the 'Honour' Crimes & Violence against Women Conference at Kings College, London, 20th April, 2005.
[C30] 'Naming 'Honour' Based Violence: Who’s Listening?' Presented to the International Conference on 'Honour' - Based Violence, Victoria Plaza, London, 21-22 March, 2005.
[C29] 'Forced Marriage: The effectiveness of introducing a specific criminal offence'. Presented to Forced Marriages - An International Perspective Conference at the University of Central England, Birmingham, 23rd February, 2005.
[C28] ‘Responding to young Asian women who are at risk of self-harm & violence in the name of ‘honour’’. Presented at the Annual General Meeting, Roshni Project, Nottingham, 20th December, 2004.
[C27] VAW and the treatment of undocumented South Asian women in the UK. Presented to Protection and Aid for Female Marriage Migrants Conference, Hotel Villa Del Mare, Maratea, Italy, 19-22 September 2004.
[C26] ‘Knowing your place’: Gender, Community and State Interventions. Presented to the Gendered Borders: International Conference on Women and Immigration Law in Europe, Amsterdam, Vrije Universiteit, The Netherlands, October, 2004.
[C25] ‘Responding to Honour Based Violence’, Presented to the House of Commons, Parliament, London, 9th September 2004.
[C24] What Matters is What Really Works? Feminist Reflections on Reducing Domestic Violence under New Labour, Presented with Dr Lorraine Radford to the Criminology, Governance and Regulation Conference at the Institute of Criminal Justice Studies, University of Portsmouth, UK, 6-9 July, 2004.
[C23] ‘Honour’ and Patriarchal Violence in BME communities in the UK. Presented to The Hague Conference on Violence against Women in the Name of ‘Honour’ 20-21 June 2004.
[C22] ‘Media Responses to so-called honour killings in the UK’. Presented at the Annual General Meeting, Newham Asian Women’s Project, London, March 2004.
[C21] ‘The Protection of Women against Violence’, Presented to the European Social Forum, Paris, November, 2003.
[C20] ‘Support Matters: Domestic Violence, Asian Women and Public Health Services’. Presented to the Gender, Health and Violence Conference, University of Bristol, 25th April 2003.
[C19] ‘The Duty to Promote Racial Equality and its Relation to Gender’. Presented to Human Rights Panel Discussion, University of Essex, 12th March 2003.
[C18] ‘Challenging Silence: Asian Women Speaking against Violence’: Presented to A conference by and about Asian Women - Dreams Questions and Struggles, 8th March 2003.
[C17] ‘Talking About the Silent Fear: South Asian Women and the Experience of Domestic Violence’. Presented to the 6th World Conference on Dowry Burnings and Son Preference, Delhi University, India, January 2003.
[C16] ‘He Loves Me, He Loves Me Not …’. Presented to the ‘Love/Hate’ Graduate Conference, University of Essex, February 2002.
[C15] Essex Sociologists at Work Guest Lecture, University of Essex, February 2002.
[C14] ‘Sensitive Narratives in Qualitative Research’. Presented to ‘A’ Level Conference, Kingston College, London, February 2002.
[C13] ‘Asian Women and Self Harm in Britain’. Presented to First National Conference on Asian Women and Mental Health, Newham Asian Women’s Project, March 2001.
[C12] ‘Gender Terrorism and Human Rights’. Presented to SC111 Students, University of Essex, March 2001.
[C11] ‘Gender, Ethnicity and Domestic Violence Discourse – Voicing Silence’. Centre for Family Studies, University of Cambridge, November 2000.
[C10] ‘Asian Women, Culture and Resistance’. Presented to the Culture and Resistance Conference, University of Surrey, September 2000.
[C9] ‘Gender, Citizenship and Domestic Violence’. Presented to the 7th International Summer School on Religions in Europe, Florence, Italy, August 2000.
[C8] ‘“A Far Cry”’: Asian Women Domestic Violence and Coping Strategies’. Presented to the National Police Training Conference on the Impact of Domestic Violence on Asian Women, Bramshill, Hampshire, June 2000.
[C7] ‘“Speaking the Unspeakable”’: South Asian Women and Domestic Violence in Britain’. Presented to the Euro Conference on Women Violence and Reconciliation, Trinity College Dublin, March 2000.
[C6] ‘Domestic Violence and Social Exclusion in a South Asian Community’. Presented to the ESRC Networks and Social Exclusion Seminar Series, January 2000.
[C5] ‘Prostitution and Pornography’: Violence and Abuse in the Family. Asian Women and Children's Experiences Conference. Presented to Asian Women Professionals and Community Activists, Royal Station Hotel, Newcastle, November 1999.
[C4] ‘Findings of Research: South Asian Women and Domestic Violence’. Presented to Southampton City Council Conference on Examining the Impact of Domestic Violence on South Asian Women, Civic Centre, Southampton, December 1999.
[C3] ‘South Asian Women and Domestic Violence: Community Research as Empowerment’. Presented to SC111 Students, University of Essex, November 1999.
[C2] ‘Voicing the Unspoken amongst Hidden Populations’. Presented to the Sociology Graduate Conference, University of Essex, June 1999.
[C1] ‘A Matter of Honour: Asian Women and Domestic Violence’. Presented to the Sociology Graduate Conference, University of Essex, June 1998.

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Department news

Royal Festival Hall graduation seals University’s London status

More than 2,500 students will graduate from the University of Roehampton with degrees from Dance to Human Resources Management today and tomorrow, and for the first time ever, they will be graduating at the Royal Festival Hall, on the world-famous South Bank.

Work success for graduates

A total of 92 per cent of full-time first degree graduates from the University of Roehampton were in work or further study six months after finishing their courses, a figure higher than almost any other university in London, according to the latest data released by the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

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