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More than 2,500 students will graduate from the University of Roehampton with degrees from Dance to Human Resources Management today and tomorrow, and for the first time ever, they will be graduating at the Royal Festival Hall, on the world-famous South Bank.
Hearing directly from the Pope about the need to live simply and find out what is truly important in life has been inspirational for a member of Digby Stuart College’s alumni.
Striking new details about the working lives of women, and families from the royals to the Pepys’ at the time of the Great Fire of London has been revealed, thanks to research based on the number of fireplaces in their homes.
A total of 92 per cent of full-time first degree graduates from the University of Roehampton were in work or further study six months after finishing their courses, a figure higher than almost any other university in London, according to the latest data released by the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

New figures show Roehampton is the safest inner London university, after nationwide research highlighted low levels of crime within a three mile radius of the campus.

Creating an app to explain a historic London monument, launching reading groups in prisons and helping people suffering from Parkinson’s Disease to dance has secured three University of Roehampton staff a place in the finals of a national awards.

The University of Roehampton will host an event as part of the Being Human festival (15-23 November), the UK’s first national festival of the humanities. The event is made possible by a grant from the festival organisers, the School of Advanced Study, University of London and is supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the British Academy.
Dr John Price, a historian based at the University of Roehampton, is part of a team behind a new mobile application for Smartphones and tablet computers which, for the first time, reveals the stories of the ‘everyday’ heroes and heroines commemorated on a unique Victorian memorial in London.

The University of Roehampton has today unveiled a new series of videos providing a glimpse into undergraduate life.

Dr. Ted Vallance, Reader in early modern history in the Department of Humanities, has been awarded a Lewis Walpole Library Visiting Fellowship to research the historical significance of papers of eighteenth-century historian and antiquary, Mark Noble.
Sally Osborn, a final-year PhD student in the Department of Humanities at the University of Roehampton was praised by organisers for her 'wonderful lecture' which was 'perfectly judged, informative, amusing, beautifully illustrated and enthusiastically delivered and received'. 
The University of Roehampton is offering three bursaries to support students to attend this year’s British Science Festival.
Daniel Taylor, a Doctoral student in the Department of Humanities, has been awarded the first British Society for the History of Philosophy (BSHP) essay prize for his paper on Spinoza and Politics.

The Department of Humanities has been awarded a Higher Education Academy (HEA) Teaching Development Grant to create a course module which uses the university campus as a learning resource.

The University of Roehampton’s Whitelands College held an event to discuss religious literacy in the modern world and its impact on education [26 Feb].
The University is pleased to announce the appointment of Dame Jacqueline Wilson as its new Chancellor. She will succeed current Chancellor, John Simpson in August 2014.
Susan Deacy, Principal Lecturer in Classical Civilisation, Department of Humanities, awarded funding by the Higher Education Academy to run a project promoting excellence in teaching and learning.  
Classical Civilisation student Eleanor Warrington travels to Jordan to work on a production of a classical Greek play.
Dr Ted Vallance, Reader in Early Modern History in the Department of Humanities, will take part in a discussion about the legacy of the Diggers, a seventeenth-century radical group, on BBC Radio 4's Making History at 3pm tomorrow (14 January).