Doctoral culture

We have developed a vibrant postgraduate research community which has been enhanced by several recent successes in the AHRC TECHNE funding consortium as well as by studentships funded through external grant revenue. 

You can find out more about the research degrees we offer at Roehampton, how to apply and how we can support you during the application process here.

Doctoral students are supported by expert teams of supervisors as well as by a dedicated Research Degrees Convenor. Each postgraduate student is offered teaching opportunities through our peer-observation scheme, supporting undergraduate dissertation students, and our in-house SEDA-accredited training for teaching, the completion of which leads to an Associate Fellowship of the HEA.  

To foster a strong sense of community among our postgraduates, and to give them greater experience of research dissemination, we have instigated a number of initiatives, which include: 

  • Special research days, such as the postgraduate/early career researcher conference on ‘New Research into Death and Trauma in Antiquity’ in December 2020.
  • A dedicated annual Postgraduate Conference to provide an opportunity to share research in a collegial and supportive environment. 
  • An in-house journal for postgraduates entitled Roundtable, which is designed to give postgraduates and early career researchers experience of editing and reviewing, as well as submitting, revising and publishing, academic research. 
  • Fortnightly virtual ‘coffee mornings’ in which students and staff can discuss any issues that emerge from their work, be they intellectual, personal or practical. 

Our postgraduate students come from a variety of backgrounds and actively pursue research projects that foreground diversity and inclusion. For example Kariima Ali, who is funded by a TECHNE Collaborative Doctoral Award is working in partnership with the Black Cultural Archives in Brixton to explore the history of grass-roots organising around the issue of Black women’s mental health in Britain from the 1970s to the present. Our students also go on to pursue a range of successful careers in academic, professional and literary life. For example, Jean Menzies published Greek Myths: Meet the Heroes, Gods and Monsters of Ancient Greece, a book aimed at children between 7 and 9, which won the Books Are My Bag Breakthrough Author Award in 2020.  Meanwhile, another of our PhD students, Lauren Ryall-Waite, who is funded by the Wellcome Trust through the Surgery & Emotion project, is currently Head Curator of thea book aimed at children between 7 and 9, which won the Books Are My Bag Breakthrough Author Award in 2020.  Meanwhile, another of our PhD students, Lauren Ryall-Waite, who is funded by the Wellcome Trust through the Surgery & Emotion project, is currently Head Curator of the Science and Industry Museum in Manchester.

You can find out more about our students' research here.