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Prof Semple and Prof MacLarnon co-investigators on two research grants

Prof Stuart Semple and Prof Ann MacLarnon from the Department of Life Sciences are co-investigators on two recently awarded research grants.

Posted: 11 September 2013

image for news story Prof Semple and Prof MacLarnon co-investigators on two research grants
Adult Rhesus monkey

The first, funded by the Leverhulme Trust, is for a project looking at "Emotional awareness as a basis for social success in a non-human: the domestic horse"; the three year project is led by Prof Karen McComb from the University of Sussex. The second grant is from NC3Rs for the project "Attention bias: a novel method to assess psychological wellbeing in group-housed non-human primates". A former PhD student of Stuart and Ann, Dr Emily Bethell of Liverpool John Moores University, is leading this one year project.

In both projects, Stuart and Ann are providing expertise on evaluating animals' emotional wellbeing using behavioural observation and non-invasive hormonal techniques. For the latter, saliva samples from animals will be analysed for levels of stress hormones in the University of Roehampton Hormone Laboratory.

More information about Dr Bethell's research can be found here.

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