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An interview with Melvin Burgess

An interview with Melvin Burgess, known for his controversial teenage fiction, most notably the Carnegie Medal and Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize winner Junk.

Posted: 15 May 2012

The Department of English and Creative Writing and the National Centre for Research in Children's Literature
 hosted critically acclaimed author, Melvin Burgess.

Melvin Burgess has made a powerful name for himself in the world of children’s and young adult literature, emerging in the 1990s as the author of a succession of critically acclaimed novels and as a vocal advocate for his young readership.

Although he began writing for younger children, he is best known for his controversial teenage fiction, most notably the Carnegie Medal and Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize winner Junk (1996), which explored adolescent encounters with heroin in 1980s Bristol.

Burgess lectured on his more recent novels for young people and his current writing projects, here he talks to Dr Alison Waller and about the authors who have inspired him, how he came to write for teenagers, and his thoughts about why his work is being studied by students and academics.

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