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Public Lecture to Launch the Memory Network

Writers and critics working in the arts and humanities are turning to new ways of thinking in science whilst scientists acknowledge the creative ideas offered by the arts and humanities.

Posted: 21 November 2011

image for news story Public Lecture to Launch the Memory Network
The Memory Network provokes and fuels original ways of thinking about memory.

In recent years our understanding of memory has been enhanced by developments in science and technology. Writers and critics working in the arts and humanities are turning to new ways of thinking in science whilst scientists acknowledge the creative ideas offered by the arts and humanities.
The Memory Network provides an imaginative intellectual response to this development by bringing together researchers, authors and organisations to provoke and fuel original ways of thinking about memory.
To launch The Memory Network, A. S. Byatt, the author of Possession and co-editor of Memory: an anthology, will contemplate our understanding of memory through the lenses of science, art and narrative.
Her lecture will be followed by an interdisciplinary panel discussion by members of the Memory Network: neuroscientist Hugo Spiers, psychologist Charles Fernyhough, and literary critic Patricia Waugh.
The event is a collaborative venture between Roehampton and Durham University and is generously sponsored by the Wellcome Trust.

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