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Professor Mick Cooper and Neuroskeptic at student conference

The Department of Psychology is delighted to announce that Professor Mick Cooper and anonymous science blogger Neuroskeptic will present at the fifth student conference on Thursday 24 April.

Posted: 27 March 2014

image for news story Professor Mick Cooper and Neuroskeptic at student conference

In February, Mick joined the Department as Professor of Counselling Psychology. He is an internationally recognised figure in the areas of humanistic, existential, relational and pluralistic therapy. Mick's main area of research interest has been school-based counselling.

Neuroskeptic is a research-active British neuroscientist who has been highlighting important findings, and criticising public (and professional) misunderstandings of those findings. His identity is unknown and his blog-icon is a disembodied brain with two eyeballs.

The student conference is an excellent opportunity for final year students to present their extended research projects to their peers. The event will include oral and poster presentations and a careers fair with organisations such as Arts for Dementia, Rethink Mental Illness and SANE attending.

The place conference will take place from 10.30 until 17.00 at Whitelands College.

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