loading...

The neurofunctional and neurochemical corraltaes of risk taking
Ray Norbury

This project aims to explore the behavioural and neural correlates of risky decision making in healthy adults using a number of imaging techniques (FMRI, MRS) combined with computational modelling techniques to gain a richer understanding of the psychological mechanisms involved in risky decision making.

These models are subsequently applied to vulnerable individuals (e.g. people at increased risk for depression) to evaluate the possibility to develop effective interventions.

 

Figure X. Using multimodal imaging techniques to better understand risk taking.

We have two main interests. First, our goal is to explore the behavioural and neural correlates of risky decision making in healthy adults. We use a number of imaging techniques (FMRI, MRS) combined with computational modelling techniques to gain a richer understanding of the psychological mechanisms involved in risky decision making. Second, we apply these models to vulnerable individuals (e.g. people at increased risk for depression) with the possibility to develop effective interventions.

Methods

Functional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (FMRS) is a novel and powerful tool that allows investigation of the dynamic metabolite concentrations in the working brain in vivo. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals and metabolite concentration changes are distinct manifestations of neuronal activity and here we combine these metrics to provide complimentary information about the role of the amygdala in emotional processing.

 

Figure X. Combining FMRS and FMRI to explore amygdala function.