Andrew Wareham - Director 

Since 2005 Andrew Wareham has been Director of the British Academy Hearth Tax Project and the Centre for Hearth Tax Research at the University of Roehampton. He has edited four hearth tax volumes, including the two-volume edition of the London and Middlesex 1666 hearth tax (2014), and has published articles on the hearth tax in the Local Historian 41 (2011) and the Economic History Review 70 (2017). He has worked on the development of Hearth Tax Online with Ruth Selman and John Price (2010-17), and on Hearth Tax Digital (2019-) with Professor Georg Vogeler and colleagues from the Centre for Information Modeling at the University of Graz. In public engagement work, he has written articles for family history magazines, includuding the BBC Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine (2015), and contritubed to Centre for Hearth Tax Research events, such as 'Conference and Book Launch of the Yorkshire East Riding Hearth Tax' at the Hull History Centre (2016).

E-mail: a.wareham@roehampton.ac.uk 

 

Trevor Dean - Chairman 

Professor Trevor Dean was part of the group of historians at Roehampton University who founded the Centre for Hearth Tax Studies in 1999. At its foundation the Centre had a commitment to branching the division between cultural and economic history, and Professor Dean has served the Hearth Tax in various capacities, including Chair of the British Academy Management Committee for the Hearth Tax Project and Chair of the Centre for Hearth Tax Research Steering Group. Wider comparative publications on social and economic history include, 'Wealth distribution and litigation in the medieval Italian countryside: Castel San Pietro, Bologna, 1385' Continuity & Change, 17 (2002), pp. 333-50.'

E-mail: t.dean@roehampton.ac.uk

 

Catherine Ferguson - General Editor of Hearth Tax series

Catherine Ferguson is the General Editor of the British Record Society Hearth Tax Series which is produced in conjunction with the British Academy Hearth Tax Project & Centre for Hearth Tax Research at Roehampton University. She has edited five of the hearth tax volumes: Westmorland (2008), Essex (2012) London and Middlesex (2014), East Riding of Yorkshire (2015) and Bristol (2018). Other publications include a chapter on the hearth tax and the poor in post-Restoration Woking in Faith in Place and People: Essays in honour of Professor Margaret Spufford, ed. T. Dean, G. Parry and E. Vallance (Boydell & Brewer, 2018). She used to be a lecturer in history at the University of Surrey, and has a particular interest in the early-modern history of the county, regularly lecturing at Surrey Archaeological Society symposia and conferences.

E-mail: please contact Andrew Wareham and/or Aaron Columbus

 

Edward Vallance - Professor of early modern British political culture

Ted Vallance's work focuses on questions of loyalty and allegiance in seventeenth-century England. His research employs a variety of name-rich documents (petitions, addresses and oath rolls). His most recent book project, Loyalty, Memory and Public Opinion in England, 1658-1727 (Manchester UP, 2019), uses hearth tax records to help map the social and geographical spread of subscribers to loyal addresses. Ted has also written on the value of these documents (specifically oath rolls) for family historians in BBC Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine (2008). He has also contributed to Centre for Hearth Tax Research outreach events ('Early Modern Ancestors' Day' 2010 and University of the Third Age Training Day, 2019), and was a co-editor of Place and People: Essays in honour of Professor Margaret Spufford, ed. T. Dean, G. Parry and E. Vallance (Boydell & Brewer, 2018).

E-mail: edward.vallance@roehampton.ac.uk

 

Research Fellows

Vanessa Harding - urban history in the early modern period

Vanessa Harding is Professor of London History at Birkbeck, University of London, where she teaches early modern history, especially the history of London, at BA and MA level, and supervises PhD research. Her own research and writing focuses on London families, households, and housing and the built environment, with a particular interest in death and burial; she has directed funded research projects and published widely on these topics. She was a co-investigator on the AHRC-funded London Hearth Tax Project (2007-10) and contributed to the two-volume edition of the London and Middlesex 1666 hearth tax (2014). She is currently researching and writing a monograph on seventeenth-century London and developing a project to map London on the eve of the Great Fire.

E-mail: v.harding@bbk.ac.uk

 

Elizabeth Parkinson - hearth tax administration

Elizabeth Parkinson has been involved with the Hearth Tax Project since its adoption by the British Academy in 2004 and has contributed to most of the British Academy & British Record Society volumes since then, having edited four hearth tax volumes: County Durham (2006), London and Middlesex (2014), East Riding of Yorkshire (2015) and Bristol (2018). Her particular interest is in the administration of the tax, for its frequent changes introduced new officials unfamiliar with the changing law and regulations. What appears as a simple list of householders’ names and hearth numbers may not be what it seems. Research on the recently catalogued exemption certificates corroborates this finding. The importance of viewing each list within its particular administrative phase is discussed by Parkinson in many of the published volumes and in her book on the early years of the tax administration from 1662 to 1666.

E-mail: please contact Andrew Wareham and/or Aaron Columbus

 

Peter Seaman - hearth tax records

Peter Seaman was an Archivist at The National Archives (TNA), where since his retirement he has been a Volunteer.  His speciality is the records of the hearth tax, on which he spoke at a conference in 1997 and met Margaret Spufford.  His transcription of some of the Norfolk hearth tax exemption certificates was published as volume 3 of the British Academy (BA) & British Record Society (BRS) hearth tax Series in 2001.  He joined the BRS Council in 2007, and having pointed out the value of the Lady Day 1666 London and Middlesex hearth tax assessment was a contributor to the two-volume edition.  He has catalogued the hearth tax exemption certificates of eighteen English and two Welsh counties, often in support of BRS hearth tax volumes (his lists were published in the Essex and London & Middlesex volumes).  Peter is also a member of the British Academy Hearth Tax Project Management Committee, and is an Honorary Research Fellow of the Department of Humanities, Roehampton University.  His transcription of the Norfolk 1672 and Norwich 1671 Hearth Tax will be a forthcoming in the BA & BRS hearth tax series volume.

E-mail: please contact Andrew Wareham and/or Aaron Columbus

 

Consultants

Simon Neal - palaeographer

Simon is a freelance historical researcher and documents specialist and has worked for the Hearth Tax Project for several years checking and transcribing entries for many counties. He has recently been employed as a project officer on the Manorial Documents Register for Leicestershire and Rutland. Before that he worked for several years on the project Completing the Patent Rolls for Elizabeth I, and then on a project about St Stephen’s Chapel, Westminster.

E-mail: simonneal304@gmail.com

 
Mike Shand - GIS cartographer
 
Mike has been involved in the GIS mapping of hearth tax data since 1999 when he completed the maps for the Kent Volume with Professor Margaret Spufford.  To date he has undertaken the mapping of 12 volumes for the Hearth Project & Centre,  and has prepared the GIS base data for six other work-in-progress counties.  In addition to his work on the Hearth Tax Project & Centre, as a GIS Cartographer at the University of Glasgow he has also been involved in giving GIS mapping and teaching support to many international university research projects, especially in Tanzania.