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Professional training, development and practice in the psychological therapies.

CREST_Professional_therapies_image

How do counsellors, psychotherapists and counselling psychologists learn their craft? How do they learn to be effective, ethical and empathic psychotherapeutic practitioners? What is the impact of the current socio-political climate on training programmes and how does this influence the way we think about clinical practice within public sector organisations?

Introduction

Despite the growing number of psychotherapeutic training programmes across the UK, there is little agreement about how best to train counsellors, counselling psychologists and psychotherapists. CREST members are interested in exploring how trainees learn by hearing about the experiences of trainees and trainers on psychotherapeutic and counselling psychology programmes. A recent focus of interest has been the development of ‘reflective practice’ and its applications within training and clinical practice, including the significance of the clinician’s own therapy and other personal development activities. We are also interested in evaluating and enhancing methods of teaching and learning within the psychological therapies, including development of a theoretical and empirical basis for training practices.

However, the increasing ‘professionalisation’ of the ‘psy’ field in today’s political and cultural climate raises a number of complex issues and challenges for those teaching and learning on counselling psychology and other psychotherapeutic training programmes. We are interested in exploring the impact of the current socio-political climate on clinical practice and training as well as theorising the unconscious organisational dynamics that arise within training institutions and mental health services. We are also interested in what can be learned from the experiences of trainees and professional practitioners working in specific clinical contexts with specific client groups.

Current projects and planned papers.

  • O’Callaghan, J. A discursive approach to self-regulation as ethical self-formation: the beautiful game of studying. For: Qualitative Research.
  • This article proposes an alternative approach to understanding self-regulatory practices for studying in autonomous settings such as higher education. Rather than being informed by traditional psychological approaches to self-regulation, they are critiqued as socially prescribed.
  • Rizq, R. ‘States of abjection in managed care’. Chapter in: Psychological Therapy and the ‘Battle for the Soul’: From Managed Care to Practitioner Research. Ed. John Lees to be published autumn 2015.
    This chapter draws on Kristeva’s (1982) notion of ‘abjection’ to explore unconscious organisational dynamics within public sector mental health services. It suggests that contemporary preoccupations with regulation, surveillance and governance in public mental health institutions may be characterized as a symbolic attempt to gain mastery over feelings unconsciously deemed to be abject reminders of the body.
  • Rizq, R. ‘Counselling, care and compliance in the NHS’. Target journal: Psychodynamic Practice
    This paper draws attention to the issue of compliance in current views of ‘treatment’ within mental health services.

Selected publications

  • Donati, M. & Watts, M. H. (2000). Personal Development in Counselling Psychology Training: The case for further research. Counselling Psychology Review, 15 (1) pp.12-21.
  • Donati, M. & Watts, M. H. (2005). Personal development in counsellor training: towards a clarification of inter-related concepts. British Journal of Guidance & Counselling, 33 (4) pp. 475- 484.
  • Donati, M. & Legg, C (2010). Getting the most out of personal therapy. In Bor, R. and Watts, M. (Eds.) The trainee handbook: A guide for counselling and psychotherapy trainees, pp. 217-231, (3rd ed). London: Sage.
  • Donati, M. (in press). Becoming a reflective practitioner. In B. Douglas, R. Woolfe, E. Kasket and V. Galbraith. The handbook of counselling psychology (5th ed). London: Sage.
  • Donati, M. (in press). How to write a research proposal. In A. Vossler and N. Moller (Eds.) The counselling and psychotherapy research handbook. London: Sage.
  • Rizq, R. (2006) ‘Training and disillusion in Counselling Psychology: a psychoanalytic perspective’. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice 79 (4): 613-627
  • Rizq, R. (2007) ‘On the margins: a psychoanalytic perspective on the location of counselling, psychotherapy and counselling psychology training in universities’ British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 35(3):283-297
  • Rizq, R. and Target, M. (2008). 'The power of being seen: an interpretative phenomenological analysis of how experienced counselling psychologists describe the meaning and significance of personal therapy in clinical practice'. British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 36, 2, 131-152.
  • Rizq, R. and Target, M. (2008). 'Not a little Mickey Mouse thing: how experienced counselling psychologists describe the significance of personal therapy in clinical practice and training'. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, 21, 1, 1-20.
  • Rizq, R. and Target, M. (2009). 'The power of being seen: an interpretative phenomenological analysis of how experienced counselling psychologists describe the meaning and significance of personal therapy in clinical practice'. Winner: Excellence in Research Award (2008), Division of Counselling Psychology: Counselling Psychology Review 24, 3 & 4: 66-85.
  • Rizq, R. (2009): ‘Teaching as transformation: a psychoanalytic perspective on psychotherapeutic training’. British Journal of Psychotherapy, 25, 3: 363-380 http://dx.doi/org/10.1111/j.1752-0118.2009.01131.x
  • Rizq, R., Hewey, M., Salvo, L., Spencer, M. Varnaseri, H., and Whitfield, J. ‘Reflective voices: Primary Care Mental Health Workers’ experiences in training and practice’. (2010) Primary Health Care Research and Development. 11: 72-86
  • Rizq, R. (2010) ‘Personal Development’ in: The Handbook of Counselling Psychology (3rd Edition) Eds. R. Woolfe, S. Strawbridge, B. Douglas and W. Dryden. London, Sage Publications.
  • Rizq, R. and Target, M. (2010a) ‘If that’s what I need, it could be what someone else needs’. Exploring the role of attachment and reflective-function in counselling psychologists’ accounts of how they use personal therapy in clinical practice: a mixed-methods study. British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 38, 4: 459-481.
  • Rizq, R. and Target, M. (2010b) ‘We had a constant battle’. The role of attachment status in counselling psychologists’ experiences of personal therapy. Some results from a mixed methods study. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, 23, 4: 1-27.
  • Rizq, R. (2011) ‘Personal therapy in psychotherapeutic training: current research and future directions’. Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy 41,3: 175-185
  • Rizq, R. (2011) 'Straddling the contradictions: understanding and conceptualising the role of attachment status in counselling psychologists' accounts of personal therapy'. European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling, 13,3: 187-211.
  • Rizq, R. (2011) ‘IAPT, anxiety and envy: a psychoanalytic view of NHS primary care mental health services today’. British Journal of Psychotherapy, 27, 1, 37-55. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-0118.2010.01221.x
  • Rizq, R. (2012) ‘There’s always this sense of failure’. An interpretative phenomenological analysis of primary care counsellors’ experiences of working with the borderline client. Journal of Social Work Practice 26, 1: 31-54
  • Rizq, R. (2012) The Ghost in the Machine: IAPT and organisational melancholia. British Journal of Psychotherapy, 28, 3: 319-335. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-0118.2012.01281.x
  • Rizq, R. (2012) 'The Perversion of Care: Psychological Therapies in a time of
    IAPT'. Psychodynamic Practice, 18, 1: 7–25.
  • Rizq, R. (2013). The language of healthcare. Therapy Today, March: 20-24.
  • Rizq, R. (2013). States of Abjection. Organization Studies, 34,9:1277-1297. http://oss.sagepub.com/content/34/9/1277
  • Rizq, R. (2013) IAPT and thoughtcrime: language, bureaucracy and the evidence-based regime. Counselling Psychology Review, Vol. 28, No. 4: 111-115.
  • Rizq, R. (2014) Perversion, neoliberalism and therapy: the audit culture in mental health services. Psychoanalysis, Culture and Society 19, 209–218.
  • Rizq, R (2014). Perverting the course of therapy: the fetishization of governance in public sector mental health services Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, 28, 3: 248-266. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02668734.2014.933034

Presentations.

Donati, M, (2001). Personal Development in Counselling Psychology Training: Some preliminary research findings. Symposium paper presented at the Division of Counselling Psychology Annual Conference

Donati, M, (1999). Personal Development in Counselling Psychology Training: The case for further research. Paper presented at the Division of Counselling Psychology Annual Conference.

Rizq, R. (2012). ‘Psychological Therapies in Public Sector Services: the State we’re in’. Talk for the Wessex Psychotherapy Group, January 2012.

Rizq, R. (2013) ‘Counselling, care and compliance in the NHS’. Universities Psychotherapy and Counselling Association Annual Conference, November 2013.

Rizq, R. (2013) ‘Perverting the course of therapy’: Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy NOW Conference October 2013.

Rizq, R. (2014) ‘The perversion of care’. Northern Ireland Institute for Human Relations, June 2014.

Rizq, R. (2014). ‘Therapy: treatment or journey’. Counsellors’ Collective Southwest LLP Conference, November 2014.

Research interests.

The role and impact of personal development activities within psychotherapeutic training and clinical practice.

Evaluating teaching and learning in counselling, psychotherapy and counselling psychology training.

Theorising unconscious organisational dynamics within training institutions and public sector services.


For inquiries, please contact Dr. Mark Donati, Programme Convenor, doctoral programme in Counselling Psychology on: mark.donati@roehampton.ac.uk