loading...

Nozomi by bass_nrollInterdisciplinary reading group on The Family

This reading group is organised by Charlotte Faircloth and Amanda Holt (Social Sciences, University of Roehampton, London) in collaboration with the Research Group in Sex, Gender and Sexuality SeGS (Department of Humanities, University of Roehampton).

Hosted by Digby Stuart College at the University of Roehampton this is a twice-termly reading group for academics with an interest in family, gender and feminism. 

14th March 2016

  • 4-5.30pm
  • Erasmus House, Room 107, University of Roehampton

We are delighted to be welcoming Dr Zeynep Gurtin from the Reproductive Sociology Research Group at the University of Cambridge, who will be joining us for a discussion around infertility, reproductive technologies and migration.

Readings

  • Gürtin-Broadbent, Z. (2009) “Anything to become a mother”: Migrant Turkish Women's Experiences of Involuntary Childlessness and Assisted Reproductive Technologies in London.’ In Culley, L, Hudson, N & van Rooij, F. (eds) Marginalised Reproduction: Ethnicity Infertility and Reproductive Technologies. Earthscan.

  • Inhorn, Marcia C., (2011) “Diasporic Dreaming: ‘Return Reproductive Tourism’ to the Middle EastReproductive BioMedicine Online 23 (5): 582– 591.

These readings explore a rarely discussed aspect of fertility treatment, namely the ways in which individuals from minority or foreign backgrounds negotiate - in addition to the myriad complexities and challenges of involuntary chiildlessness - issues around identity, belonging, difference, and even perceived prejudice within the clinic. The first article, by Gurtin, explores the experiences of Turkish migrants in the UK , whilst the second by Inhorn discusses "return reproductive tourism" to the Middle East. Please contact Charlotte if you would like copies of the readings. 

We hope that these events will foster some interesting cross-disciplinary conversation, and lead to collaborative events in the future. Tea and coffee will be provided, and all are welcome, so please spread the word!

Examples of Recent and Past Events

Interdisciplinary reading group on The Family

  • Dr. Amanda Holt (Dept of Social Sciences, University of Roehampton) led the discussion on family abuse, with reference to her recent review paper Adolescent-to-Parent Abuse as a Form of ‘‘Domestic Violence’’: A Conceptual Review, published in Trauma, Violence, Abuse (2015) and a book chapter by Jenny Kitzinger (2010) Transformations of public and private knowledge: audience reception, feminism and the experience of childhood sexual abuse. In J. Haaken and P. Reavey (Eds.) Memory Matters: Contexts of Understanding Sexual Abuse Recollections (pp. 86-104). London: Routledge. Please contact Amanda if you would like copies of the readings.

    • Date: Tuesday 8th December 2015

    • Time: 2.30-4.00pm (please note the earlier start/end time)

    • Venue: Erasmus House 1.07, Digby Stuart College

We were delighted to be welcoming Professor Linda Blum from Northeastern University, Boston, who joined us for a discussion of her new book 'Raising Generation Rx: Mothering Kids with Invisible Disabilities in an Age of Inequality’ 

Gender and the Archive: Conversation across disciplines and practices

Friday 30 January 2015, Jubilee Studio 5, Digby Stuart College, University of Roehampton, London SW15 5PH

10:00 REGISTRATION
10:30-11:30 TamboukouKEYNOTE ADDRESS
Maria Tamboukou: Entanglements in the archive of feminist memories

Audio track available on Soundcloud
11:30-12:00  COFFEE (Own arrangements; various options on campus)
12:00-1:30   PANEL 1: PERFORMING ARCHIVES
Del Mar Yanez LopezMaria del Mar Yanez-Lopez: Art historical representation and accountability: re.act.feminism #2 – a performing archive

Audio track available on Soundcloud
RobertsEleanor Roberts: Restless images: the feminist performances of Rose Finn-Kelcey

MeduriAvanthi Meduri: Performing in the postcolonial archive 

Audio track available on Soundcloud


1:30-2:30 LUNCH (Own arrangements; various options on campus)
2:30-3:30 PANEL 2: STORIES, VOICES, MEMORIES
Ingleton & PesterHolly Pester: Anecdote, gossip and fiction as modes of aberrant research
Audio track available on 
Soundcloud

Holly Ingleton: Sounding out archival interventions
Audio track available on Soundcloud
3:30-4:30  RESPONDENT Carrie Hamilton
 Followed by GENERAL DISCUSSION
4:30-5:30  WINE RECEPTION 


See abstracts and biographies (PDF).

  • Interdisciplinary reading group on The Family:
    • The first reading was this short article by Jacqueline Rose in the LRB, which reviews recent academic and popular literature on motherhood (30th October 2014)

    • Unwrapping ChristmasReading from Daniel Miller’s edited volume ‘Unwrapping Christmas’, the chapter ’The great Christmas quarrel and other Swedish traditions’, by Orvar Lofgren takes an accessible look at gender and emotion work in creating family Christmases (11th December 2014) 
    • Reading: Professor Ros Edwards (Southampton) and Professor Val Gillies (Goldsmiths) for a discussion about why it is important to retain ‘family’ as a sociological concept. This will be based on their article co-authored with Ribbens-McCarthy The politics of concepts: family and its (putative) replacements  (see summary) (9th February 2015).

  • MCL Forum: My body is my manifesto: Media, Culture and Language Forum organised by PhD students Nathalie Weidhase and Theodora Thomadaki in collaboration with this Research Group in Sex, Gender and Sexuality. Discussion of the following article: O'Keefe, T. (2014) 'My body is my manifesto: SlutWalk, Femen and femminist protest', in: Feminist Review, 107: 1-19. (November 2014)
  • Longtable with Professor Lois Weaver (Queen Mary, Split Britches Theatre Co): Gender, Feminism and Austerity (February 2013)
  • Roundtable: Women, The Cuts and Higher Education (April 2012)
  • Symposium: The Public Intellectual: Feminism, Power, Celebrity (25 May 2010, British Library, London)
  • Theory Day The Turn Away from Post-Structuralism (February 2009)
  • Seminar with Professor Deborah Cameron (University of Cambridge): Meet the Flinstones: What Evolutionary Science says about Language, Sex and Gender (November 2008; joint seminar with CRELL)
  • Launch of the Centre for Research in Sex, Gender and Sexuality - Guest speaker: Professor Judith Halberstam (University of Southern California): The Anti-Social Turn in Queer Theory (March 2007)

Research Seminars

Room: Howard Terrace Room 001

  • Weds 19 November 2014 4:30: Alessandra Abbattista - Liminality, Suspense and Anxiety: The Nightingale Imagery in Ancient Greek Tragedy 
    • By referring to the Aristophanes’ dictum, “a symbolon is a bird” (Av. 721), Struck (2004: 90) explains the etymology of the term with “a notion of meeting, as in bumping into someone or something”. Although the concept of symbol was not linked with suggestive and figurative language until the fourth century BC, I argue that the metaphorical encounter with the nightingale could produce an uncanny sense of meaningfulness in ancient Greek tragedy. By introducing the methodology of my PhD research project, which is focused on the depiction of female avengers through animal metaphors, I will explore the significance of the nightingale in Attic tragedy. By blurring the dichotomies of life and death, joy and gloom, suffering and revenge, as I will show, the wild bird was considered as a particularly apt tragic symbol. PDF poster
  • Weds 18 March 2015 4:30: Daliany Kersh (PhD candidate in History, Department of Humanities, University of Roehampton) Women's informal employment during Cuba's post-Soviet economic crisis 1990-2005
    • Women’s relationship to work is particularly important in the Cuban context given the revolution’s policy to fully immerse women in the workforce. On the eve of the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1990, women represented 38.9% of Cuban state workers. However the “Special Period” economic crisis, which followed this event, meant that the state could no longer afford to employ everybody and the value of the state wage considerably devalued. This talk aims to consider how women looked for alternative ways to earn money in a hostile post-Soviet economy. I argue that women were disproportionately affected by the crisis and many had to look for “flexible” and clandestine work from home or in the neighbourhood in order to deal with their augmented domestic responsibilities. I will use oral histories and press archives to discuss two of these alternative ways: “cuentapropismo” (self-employment) and “la lucha” (the struggle). These words are synonymous with the Special Period in Cuba and are key examples of how alternative earning-strategies played a significant role in Cuban women’s daily lives within this changing economic landscape. PDF poster
Kersh_Image-2014-15.jpeg