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Summary of Adjustments (SoA) | Specialist tuition for students with specific learning differences (SpLDs) | Specialist mentoring for disabled students | Learning Support Assistants | Exam and assessment adjustments | Departmental Disability Co-ordinator (DDC) | A Guide for Parents and Carers | Employability | Other support

Disability Services co-ordinate a wide range of support strategies based on your individual needs. We take into consideration the recommendations made in your medical evidence / diagnostic report and DSA needs assessment report. Once permission to disclose has been given (and evidence has been provided), we create an individual support plan, called a Summary of Adjustments (SoA). This information is then shared with your department and relevant staff (e.g. the Library so that extended loans can be put in place etc.). 

The University of Roehampton maintains an in house provision of Non-Medical Helper (NMH) support. Scroll down for detailed information on these support roles; click here for our NMH rates for needs assessors.

Summary of Adjustments (SoA)

Once received, your medical and diagnostic evidence information is held by Disability Services, and only viewed by staff working within Disability Services. Your support needs will not be discussed with others until you sign a disclosure form.

Disability Services review the evidence in the first instance and make recommendations regarding any disability adjustments that may be beneficial - this will be captured on a Summary of Adjustments (SoA) document.

The SoA is a document which lists adjustments that the University deems reasonable for a department to make in order for you to best demonstrate your academic ability.

Many of the adjustments are considered best practice, and staff may already be implementing them. In addition, the list created on the SoA is not comprehensive, and staff may like to discuss with you the best ways they can support you directly.

Your SoA will be emailed to you by Disability Services. Please check your SoA to make sure that you are receiving the adjustments that you are entitled to.

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Specialist tuition for students with specific learning differences (SpLDs)

Specialist tuition is for students with specific learning differences (SpLDs) such as dyslexia, dyspraxia, dyscalculia, dysgraphia and ADHD who have received funding via the Disabled Students’ Allowance (DSA) for specialist support.  Tuition is not intended to give students with SpLDs an advantage over their peers, rather the provision should address the differences which are due to your SpLD to enable you to achieve your full academic potential whilst studying at Roehampton.

Students are taught on a one-to-one basis. Where this is recommended, the sessions are developed in agreement with the student, taking into consideration the specific learning strengths and needs outlined in both the diagnostic report and the DSA needs assessment report. Tuition sessions are usually weekly for one hour per week.

The main roles of the tutor are to:

  • Support students with SpLDs to achieve their qualifications.
  • Teach students to develop learning strategies that maximise their strengths and minimise areas of difficulty, so that they become independent autonomous learners.
  • Help students to recognise both their learning strengths and weaknesses, and put strategies in place to overcome the latter.
  • Where appropriate, liaise with academic staff, together with the student, to work more effectively as a team supporting differences in learning.

Teaching sessions can be used to develop any of the following areas:

  • Writing skills.
  • Grammar.
  • Punctuation.
  • Sentence construction.
  • Reading strategies.
  • Spelling strategies.
  • Proof-reading skills.
  • Numeracy skills.
  • Skills in using assistive technology & software.
  • Presentation and oral seminar skills.
  • Research techniques (e.g. using the Library and Internet effectively).
  • Critical analysis and reflective thinking skills.
  • Time management skills. 
  • Personal organisation.
  • Memory techniques.
  • Exam revision skills.
  • Assignment planning & structuring.
  • Skills in accessing relevant information on Moodle.
  • Understanding plagiarism.
  • Mind-mapping.
  • Note-taking skills.
  • Metacognition.
  • Using tutor feedback from marked assignments to develop areas of strength.
  • Where appropriate, assisting students to liaise with module tutors to seek clarification or guidance.

The purpose of specialist teaching is to support students to develop independent study skills.

If you have been recommended specialist study skills in your needs assessment report, or you feel this would be useful for you, please contact dyslexia@roehampton.ac.uk to discuss this further.

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Specialist mentoring for disabled students

Specialist mentoring is for students with Autistic Spectrum conditions, mental health and long term health conditions who have received funding via the Disabled Students’ Allowance (DSA) for specialist support.  The provision should address any difficulties which are due to your disability, to help you achieve your full academic potential whilst studying at Roehampton.

Mentoring sessions are carried out on a one-to-one basis and the sessions are developed in agreement with the student, taking into consideration the specific learning strengths and needs outlined in both the diagnostic report and the DSA needs assessment report. Mentoring sessions are usually weekly for one hour per week. Some students may require more support at the start of their course to aid with the transition to Higher Education.

The main roles of the mentor are to:

  • Support students with ASD, Mental Health and long term health conditions  to achieve their qualifications.
  • Ensure that students manage their academic workload within the context of their condition.
  • Provide general support which encourages autonomy and self-management, enabling the student to become more independent, confident in their work and to ultimately have a more successful university experience.
  • Mentors are appointed to assist students with gaining access to their studies, their university environment and life on campus.

Mentoring sessions can be used to develop any of the following areas:

  • Presentation and oral seminar skills.
  • Communication and social interaction skills.
  • Help in accessing the Library and other areas on campus.
  • Time management skills.
  • Personal organisation.
  • Build confidence and self-esteem.
  • Dealing with change.
  • Skills in accessing relevant information on Moodle.
  • Using tutor feedback from marked assignments to develop areas of strength.
  • Where appropriate, advocacy support – e.g. helping students to approach module tutors to seek clarification or guidance.
  • Prepare for field trips or practical placements.
  • Effective study strategies if they are struggling with organisation, motivation, time management, and staying focussed on their work.

Specialist mentoring is part of a package of services and should encourage students to develop independence and self-confidence. 

If you have been recommended specialist mentoring in your needs assessment report, or you feel this would be useful for you, please contact disabilities@roehampton.ac.uk to discuss this further.

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Learning Support Assistants

This support is provided for students with disabilities where inclusive approaches to teaching will not meet the disability related needs as outlined in the needs assessment.  Learning Support Assistant (LSA) support will no longer be funded by the Disabled Students' Allowance (DSA) from September 2016. LSAs may cover the following roles: 

• Manual note-taking
• Examination support workers, such as readers and scribes
• Study Assistants
• Library Support Assistants
• Practical Support Assistants 

N.B. No personal care is carried out by a Learning Support Assistant - see Funding for information on personal assistance.

The main aims of the Learning Support Assistant are to:

  • Support students with physical, sensory or other health related conditions to achieve their qualifications;
  • Ensure that you can manage your academic requirements without being disadvantaged by your condition/s;
  • Assist you to gain equal access to your studies, university environment and life on campus.

Where required, students will be provided with a Learning Support Assistant if this is the best way to meet their needs, as identified in an initial needs assessment. Students should discuss their needs and how they can be met with the Disability Adviser - to book an appointment with a Disability Adviser, please click here to fill in our online booking form. Alternatively you can:

 >  phone our office on 0208 392 3636
 >  send an email to disabilities@roehampton.ac.uk
 > come in to see us in person to make an appointment. We are based in the Richardson building, Digby Stuart campus.

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Exam and assessment adjustments

We can make recommendations for adjustments in exams wherever appropriate as outlined below. Please provide medical evidence or a diagnostic report (dyslexia) to allow us to assess your needs. Requests for adjustments in exams must be made by mid-February. 

Your exam arrangements will be noted on your Summary of Adjustments (SoA), which will be emailed to you. These arrangements should also be provided for in-class tests. Your department will be sent  a copy of your SoA.

Please read your SoA carefully and let Disability Services know as soon as possible if any changes need to be made.

Extra writing time

This may be standard or a percentage, such as 25%. The amount of extra time will be stated in your medical evidence/diagnostic report.

Rest breaks

Rest breaks can be arranged for a number of minutes per hour of the actual exam including any extra writing time. Students with rest breaks will have their exam in an individual room. Rest breaks are not additional writing time and if the extra time is not taken for resting it will be lost. All extra time is rounded to the nearest 5 minutes.

An amanuensis (scribe) or reader

An amanuensis is someone who will write your answers while you dictate. A reader is someone who will read the questions or read your answer back to you. 

Students assisted by an amanuensis or reader will have their exam in an individual room with a single invigilator. You will have the opportunity to practice either method of taking an exam if you wish.

Other options

  • Ergonomic seating or equipment for students with mobility difficulties or medical conditions that might affect seating comfort in exams.
  • A computer for students who find handwriting difficult.
  • Text enlarging software or equipment for students with visual impairments.
  • Examination papers in Braille or large print for students with visual impairments.
  • Examination papers on suitably coloured paper for students with Irlen Syndrome (Scotopic Sensitivity/visual stress).
  • The use of a separate room with a few other students – or an individual exam room - can be arranged for those who might experience anxiety or distraction in a large exam hall.
  • Seating at the back, front or side of the main hall, as appropriate.
  • Alternative forms of assessment may also be possible - this should be discussed with your Departmental Disabilities Co-ordinator and Disability Services.

Please contact us to discuss your needs.

Additional time to complete coursework

All students are strongly encouraged to plan ahead and try to complete work on time. If you are worried that you will miss a deadline you can apply for an extension via the Mitigating Circumstances Portal. If additional time for coursework is on your SoA you can give this as the reason.

We recognise that students may have mitigating circumstances due to their disability, and we aim to provide clear, transparent advice and support in these cases.  Recommendations are included in the SoA, so students are not required to provide additional evidence to support applications. Guidance and forms can be found on the Mitigating Circumstances Portal.

  • For students who have been recommended extra time for coursework: the student should follow the University mitigating circumstances process and submit a Mitigating Circumstances Form to the relevant Department Office at least 2 working days before the assessment deadline. Extensions are not automatic and while every effort will be made to accommodate these requests, University deadlines may influence these arrangements.
  • For students who have been recommended occasional time off for disability related reasons, there is an expectation that students should attend all teaching sessions and activities. However, in circumstances where this is not possible due to a disability, students are advised to:
    • Report their absence by completing an Absence Form.
    • Meet with their module tutor as soon as possible to agree reasonable expectations around attendance, explore the impact any absence may have on progress, and manage any potential issues if group work is a requirement of the course.

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Departmental Disability Co-ordinator (DDC)

Departmental Disability Co-ordinators (DDCs) are located in each academic department and play a vital role in ensuring that support, via reasonable adjustments and inclusive teaching, is provided for disabled students within their departments.

The role of the DDC is key to ensuring that disabled students receive fair treatment and are given maximum opportunities for learning and participation on their chosen course of study, in line with the Equalities Act 2010.

The DDCs are a key point of contact and help to provide a holistic approach to support for disabled students at Roehampton – ensuring that there is a good flow of communication between the Disability Service, academic departments and other relevant services.

The main roles of the DDC are to:

  • Communicate with staff about the delivery of teaching, learning and assessment within the department, in such a way as to support disabled students.
  • Provide strategic advice to their Head of Department, academic colleagues and academic support staff about the Department’s duties and obligations under the Equalities Act 2010.
  • Promote disability awareness and inclusive practice within the Department/Subject.
  • Promote the professional development of colleagues in their Department in relation to disability issues; this task is to be performed in consultation with the Head of Department.
  • Attend regular meetings and relevant training with the University’s Disability Service.

DDCs have primary responsibility within their Department for the:

  • Co-ordination of activities to enable the Department to meet its obligations under the Equalities Act 2010 pertaining to students in Higher Education Institutions and any other relevant legislation or code of practice or University advice and guidance.  This task may be performed in conjunction with the Head of Department.  
  • Development of practices which enable disabled students with support needs to have equal access to the full range of the Department’s provision.
  • Effective use of the Disabled Students Summary of Adjustments (SoA) System within the department.

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A Guide for Parents and Carers

View guide

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Employability

The University of Roehampton offers a range of services to our students with a disability or specific learning difference. Visit our Employability Centre for details of a number of services which provide advice and assistance.

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Other support

It’s useful for you to make contact with the Roehampton Students’ Union (RSU) – they are a student-led organisation and are available to offer support, advice and guidance to all students, including those with disabilities.

Sport Roehampton organises a wide range of sports and physical activities, and actively encourage disabled students to participate.

The RSU and Sport Roehampton are teaming up with the University’s Student Welfare Service to create an Inclusive society this year – if you’re interested in finding out more about this, you can contact George Cole (020 8392 3068; George.Cole@roehampton.ac.uk) to enquire.

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 Contact us

Disability Services
Richardson Building
Digby Stuart College
University of Roehampton
London SW15 5PU

Disability
Tel: 020 8392 3636
Email: disabilities@roehampton.ac.uk

Dyslexia
Tel: 020 8392 3860
Email: dyslexia@roehampton.ac.uk

 

 Dyslexia Drop-ins

  • Tuesday 4-6pm
  • Wednesday 1-3pm
  • Thursday 12-2pm

Richardson Building, Digby Stuart College.

 

 Access@SW15

The access centre at Roehampton provides DSA needs assessments for students.

Contact Access@SW15
Tel: 020 8392 3403
Email: accesscentre@roehampton.ac.uk

The information provided on these pages was correct on the date of publishing. Some of the support services are dependent on government funding and may change in line with legislation.